Brendan Fitzpatrick’s Photographs Of X-Rayed Toys

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Australian photographer Brendan Fitzpatrick’s X-ray photographs expose the inner workings of toys. Fitzpatrick’s photographs are both whimsical and mechanical, evoking the curiosity of childhood and the desire to discover how things look and work from other perspectives. The strategic placement of wires, batteries, and screws are revealed, the complexity of the inside contrasting with the seemingly simplistic design of the outside. Fitzpatrick uses chest X-ray and mammogram machines to photograph flowers, toys, and creatures, then enhances the color in the images in order to more effectively distinguish the various parts that have been exposed. This photographs are part of series he calls “Invisible Light.” (via colossal)

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Takayuki Hori X-Rays Origami Animals To Highlight Pollution In Japan

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Origami is both impressive in its folded construction as well as its ability to signify the need for change by urging us to look beyond the paper forms. Animals are no doubt the most popular subject, and Japanese artist Takayuki Hori has a twist on the conventional foldings. He crafts these animals to appear as victims of Japan’s urban pollution, and the pieces expose the sad truths of what happens to these creatures. Hori showcases garbage in their insides using X-ray-like detail. If you look closely, you can see tiny bottles and other trash within the stomachs and ribcages.

These works appear in Hori’s exhibition Oritsunagumono (which means “things folded and connected”) which critiques the polluted coastal waterways and the effects they have on its inhabitants. Images are printed onto translucent sheets of paper and later folded into their origami shapes. The result are a ghostly tribute and haunting reminder of our impact on the environment. (Via Fast Co. Design)

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Delicate X-Ray Photographs Offer A Touchingly Intimate Glimpse Into The Everyday

hughturvey_655_london_oxo_exhibition_2014_smithsonian_0000_layer_comp_1.jpg__1072x0_q85_upscalehughturvey_655_london_oxo_exhibition_2014_smithsonian_0015_layer_comp_16.jpg__1072x0_q85_upscalehughturvey_655_london_oxo_exhibition_2014_smithsonian_0017_layer_comp_18.jpg__1072x0_q85_upscaleHugh Turvey X-Ray images

The artist Hugh Turvey lives his life in x-ray vision; since her began creating his vivid, colored x-ray photographs, titled xograms, he views the world and its objects as something to be dissected, unveiled, and understood. Turvey’s strange x-rays are made thusly: he begins by positioning his subjects on light-sensitive paper, then overlays them with photographs and adds color so as to enhance depth.

X-ray technology, which we so often associated with sterile medicine, healthcare, and the danger of internal injury, finds an oddly tender home in Turvey’s work. Dense objects become visual synecdoches, stand-ins for living subjects; in one image, a coat becomes personified, its zippers, seams, and wrinkles suggesting human posture. Femme Fatale pictures the artist’s wife’s foot: contorted, stressed, delicate.

When placed alongside these relatively personal images, x-rays of suitcases, phones, and first-aid kits no longer retain the cold, effective objectivity we are accustomed to seeing during TSA screenings and the like. Instead, we are offered a satisfyingly voyeuristic glimpse into the private lives of others as seen through a tumbler or a martini glass, and we are transfixed by the mundane, incidental objects of existence.

Turvey’s portraits of animals are particularly poignant, indicating the complex internal lives of creatures we too rarely consider. A fish is confined to a painfully isolating bowl, his boney frame drifting to the top for food, and a small dog reveals soft, beautifully coiled internal organs as he wears a cone around his head. Similarly, a curious rabbit is shown in dark, moody browns evocative not of medicine so much as psychology and spirit; his wide eyes peer above the hat. These deeply sympathetic animals are made all the more delicate by Turvey’s process, their curiosities and concerns expressed through the barest physicality. (via Smithsonian Mag, The Guardian, and National Geographic)
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MATTHEW COX’s X-Ray Pop Culture Collages

X-ray and embroidery by Philadelphia based Mathew Cox.

“By joining the cold, blue, medically technical plastic of the x-ray with the colorful, decorative and tactile embroidery thread each is removed from its original intention and creates a new entity.  Handling these media also gives me an opportunity to comment on the ever-increasing presence of photography in contemporary art- by introducing labor over the quick, slickness of film.
In Heartthrobs, Avatars and Playboys, 2011 – 2012, I am transporting this technique to a new place using iconic heartthrobs from Pop culture such as Snow White and David Bowie and avatars from Eastern religion and Greek mythology such as Krishna and Minotaur.  The possible visual imagery is rich, vast and exciting.  This new move has also given me an opportunity to physically move out of the rectangle of the x-ray by extending the embroidery upward and outside of the frame.”

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