Nicole Gastonguay’s Cute Characters That Resemble Mundane Objects

Nicole Gas­tonguay Nicole Gas­tonguay Nicole Gas­tonguay

Wouldn’t you just love it if all your everyday interactions with household items were as fun as looking at these cute crochet creations? Nicole Gas­tonguay, a graphic designer and fiber artist, replicates mundane objects- food, toast, pickles, and even boom boxes- by using yarn. She puts a smile (or a frown- depending on what the object is) and a pair of big googly eyes in all her creation. (via Brown Paper Bag)

Read More >


Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Soft Core – Erik Ravelo’s Kama Sutra Inspired Figurative Installations

Schermata-01-2455938-alle-16.41

Schermata-01-2455938-alle-16.56

Kama Sutra

Schermata-01-2455938-alle-16.45

 

Cuban artist Erik Ravelo is known for his ability to confront the difficult and taboo directly by presenting fearless, visually provocative work (previously featured for his Los Intocables, or The Untouchables, series here). Lana Sutra (combining the Spanish word ‘Lana’ meaning ‘Wool’ and ‘Sutra’, which means the thread which connects us) takes the idea of these strings – love, humanity, sexuality – and displays them literally, binding human forms together in intense colored poses. “I’m a human being and I don’t believe in borders. I think the world belongs to everyone born on Earth. This is my planet, our planet. No man is an island. Yes, I was born on Cuba but, above all, I was born on Planet Earth. I like to think that Lana Sutra talks about universal love which cancels diversity.”

Created during his residency at Italian communication research and artistic grant center Fabrica (connected with clothing brand United Colors of Benneton), Ravelo began Lana Sutra by guiding models to pose together, and then casting these poses in plaster. The plaster mannequins were then covered in yarn (in the fall colors of the Benneton line), with separate colored threads from each mannequin being bound together in Kama Sutra positions. Bursting with color, the fifteen installations of present a completely unbiased version of humanity, no longer separated by race, religion, creed or sexuality, and merely bound by our shared humanity. (via collater.al)

Read More >


Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

HOTTEA Canopy Covers Williamsburg Bridge With ‘Ritual’

Rituals5

Rituals6

Rituals3

“NYC is a very fast paced city.” said artist HOTTEA in an exclusive talk with Beautiful/Decay. “When I walked across the bridge people are either jogging, running for exercise, walking with friends or alone to get from Brooklyn to Manhattan or vice versa. When observing people walking or running across the bridge, there really wasn’t any reason to look up or slow down.  I like creating pieces that dramatically change the space and encourage people to re-look at a certain area.”

One of the most famous of the now-burgeoning international street arts scene that uses yarn and other non-damaging/permanent materials, the Minneapolis-based artist tried to create a similar project on a visit to New York several years ago, but was stopped by authorities. With careful planning and the help of several friends, HOTTEA was able to complete the public installation, creating a canopy of changing colors over a Williamsburg Bridge. Titled ‘Ritual‘, the artist explained that the very act of taking the bridge instead of the train became a ritual, slowing down his journey to the City and being able to process his day, the skyline and enjoy his surroundings. Realizing this, he wanted to create a signature work that would give others the same chance.

Referring to the installation, HOTTEA explained, “After about 5 hours, people continued to slow down but now more and more people were stopping.  Either to take photos or to interact with us directly.  When the piece was near completion after about 11 hours, everyone that came into contact with the piece either slowed down or stopped completely. I was in awe to see such a fast paced city slow down, stop and look up.” (via Colossal)

Read More >


Currently Trending

Geometric Street Art Made From Wool Yarn

spidertag street art8 spidertag street art2

spidertag street art11

On his website, the street artist Spidertag describes his work simply by writing “It´s all about nails + pure wool + geometry + abstraction + streets + abandoned”.  It can hardly be described more accurately.  Using nails and wool yarn, Spidertag installs geometric abstractions in beautifully lonely locations.  The work, as pure abstraction, doesn’t appear to reference any figurative object (except perhaps spiderwebs).  Though maybe burgeoning trend within street art, this type abstraction and material sets Spidertag’s work apart as understated and unique.

Read More >


Currently Trending

Toshiko Horiuchi MacAdam’s Hand-Knit Playground

Toshiko Horiuchi MacAdam began her career as a textile artist.  While exhibiting a piece titled “Multiple Hammock No. 1″ a couple of children in the gallery asked if they could use it.  Surprisingly she allowed the children to play on her sculpture.  The amusing incident led to an idea, and her work has since become much larger and fun.  Adding color, size, and interactivity, her work soon transformed from sculpture to public art and finally to playground.  The playground pictured here is hand knit by MacAdam and located in Tokyo.

Read More >


Currently Trending

Shaun Kardinal’s Altered States

Shaun Kardinal transforms found and scavenged postcards into geometric altered spaces that are hypnotic. His site is full of places, people and things that he’s created on found images and redistributed into the world. Read More >


Currently Trending

Jo Hamilton’s Crochet Heads

It’s not everyday that we post an artist who works with yarn but Jo Hamilton’s crochet portraits are really interesting. I’m really happy that Jo decided to not over finish these and left them without a background and with the yarn hanging down. Sort of looks like paint drips and adds another dimension to the work that you don’t see often in crochet.

Read More >


Currently Trending

Music ID2

This stop motion video was mainly created out of yarn. It’s beautiful.


Currently Trending