Get Social:

Tim Hobbelman Sculpts Futuristic-Looking Animals Out Of Discarded Electronics

Tim Hobbelman, Animaux - Sculpture Tim Hobbelman, Animaux - Sculpture Tim Hobbelman, Animaux - Sculpture Tim Hobbelman, Animaux - Sculpture

In a collection called Animaux, Netherlands-based artist Tim Hobbelman has been sculpting animals out of discarded electrical appliances, sourcing his materials from junk stores. Look closely at each creature and you will see objects such as hair dryers, headphones, and a Dustbuster, all fused together in the likeness of eyes, snouts, and wings. His strange (and slightly creepy) menagerie currently showcases a deer, bear, and wild boar, among others. Each piece captures the physical details of the individual animals, while also infusing them with an unsettling, cyborg-like appearance.

Hobbelman’s Animaux are not only clever in the skill it takes to recreate animal anatomy with electronic parts, but it is also a creative recycling practice. Non-biodegradable trash that will either be thrown into a landfill or left to gather dust on a junk shop shelf is reanimated with new life—a comment, perhaps, on the effects that such obsolescent, discarded technology has on the environment.

Hobbelman hopes to create more Animaux, so be sure to check out his Facebook page and support his work. He is also taking part in the Born as an Artist exhibition on December 18th at Instinct One in Tilburg. (Via Junkculture)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Satoshi Tomizu Traps Space, Galaxies And Planets Into Tiny Glass Spheres

Satoshi Tomizu - Sculpture 1_565x476 Satoshi Tomizu - Sculpture 9_565x374 Satoshi Tomizu - Sculpture 10_565x374 Satoshi Tomizu - Sculpture 3_565x377

An entire galaxy trapped into a tiny glass sphere. Japanese Glass artist Satoshi Tomizu in his Space Glass series fabricates planets and dust trails by heating up glass. A traditional technique using heat energy and the talent of a man. The rendering is fascinating and creates a world of magic and fantasy.

The artist depicts the solar system and the universe inside transparent glass balls. The planets are made out of opals placed in the center, flecks of real gold and trails of colored glass that spins and twirls in concentric circles. They all are the size of an eyeball and have a small glass loop which allows the piece to be turned into a pendant. Each piece in unique and different.

Satoshi Tomizu’s work is full of details. The eye can catch the twirls of colors but quickly looses track of each individual features. There’s something magical in carrying a poetic scenery around one’s neck. Space dust, rainbow colored trails, stars and asteroids are elements which evoke fantasy and the possibility to escape the present moment. (via This Is Colossal)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Marius Budu Creates Structures, Patterns And Motifs Using Naked Bodies

Marius Budu - Photography 8_565x565 Marius Budu - Photography 7_565x377 Marius Budu - Photography 1_565x377 Marius Budu - Photography 4_565x377

Female naked bodies displayed on a black monochromatic background. Photographer Marius Budu uses nudity to express the human condition. Based in Copenhagen, Denmark he has been working with nude subjects since 2006.

The women’s bodies are perfectly aligned and arranged. Forming shapes where the bodies can no longer be discerned individually. The overall images depict an architectural element rather than a gathering of women. Even though they are naked, there’s no ambiguous feeling upon looking at the photographs. Marius Budu plays with the light and shade; accentuating the different tones of the flesh. The models attitude is strong and focused, creating a powerful configuration.

The message is simple and efficient: to unveil the limitless potential of the human body. In the ‘Flesh Structures’ series, Marius Budu uses the bodies of women to tell us a story, to communicate his vision. Using the most basic mean in its original form, he translates his fascination for the human body into intense visual sculptures, inviting the viewer to “wonder or simply absorb”.

Currently Trending

Valerio Loi Explores Social Media By Turning Online Popularity Into Supermarket Goods

Valerio Loi, Web Popularity Products - Photography Valerio Loi, Web Popularity Products - Photography Valerio Loi, Web Popularity Products - Photography Valerio Loi, Web Popularity Products - Photography

Valerio Loi is a photographer who currently works between London and his birthplace of Cagliari, Italy. In a series of images called Web Popularity Products, Loi envisions a future where online popularity has been turned into physical commodities, just like food at the supermarket. With bright colors and labels stamped with the familiar icons of Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Badoo, and LinkedIn, Loi’s “products” sit inconspicuously on store shelves amongst mayonnaise and cans of corned beef. While things like Instagram followers can already be purchased online (although it is often a ridiculed practice), the increasing value of one’s online presence could one day mean we consume simulated “popularity” alongside our processed and over-packaged foods.

“The more social networks are born, the more purchasable services to increase users’ popularity are created,” Loi observes on his project description. “Alongside our physical life based on face to face interaction, nowadays many of us consider . . . online image and networking [to be really important]” (Source). In some ways, Loi’s work displays an anxiety over the current trend of social media that seems to undermine genuine human connections; his other personal project, titled Human Feelings as Drugs, similarly explores this fear of the commodification and loss of our deepest experiences and emotions. However, Loi photographs his Web Popularity Products in a relatively innocent light, allowing the viewers to decide for themselves whether social media will lead to practical transformations of human identities, or the spiritual bankruptcy thereof.

Visit Loi’s website, Facebook, and Instagram to learn more.

Currently Trending

Monica Piloni’s Dark Humor Sculptures Of Skeletal Fruit

monica-piloni-hybrid-skeletal-fruit-designboom-01 monica-piloni-hybrid-skeletal-fruit-designboom-02 monica-piloni-hybrid-skeletal-fruit-designboom-03 monica-piloni-hybrid-skeletal-fruit-designboom-04

Brazilian artist Monica Piloni creates sculptures of skeletal fruit. Her work consist of dissected papayas, figs, oranges, and peaches that’s innards expose each fruit’s meat to be structurally held together by a spine and rib simulated structure. The tiny fish-like skeletal structures within each piece of fruit is created from vinyl and acrylic. Though the pieces are indeed manmade, the delicate nature of the work truly provokes the viewer to second guess his or her knowledge of reality. Illusion as everyday object seems to be a common theme within Piloni’s work. Her sculptures mimic ordinary items and manipulate them into sculptural puns. For example, other pieces of hers play with a sort of post-modern fragility of the body, a literal “plastification” of the human form. For instance, one of her sculptures is a muscular body as a dining room chair. Another piece consists of what looks like a mass genocide of naked barbies. It seems, perhaps, that Piloni’s work aims to, with an air of dark humor, remind us of the underlying reality of our comforts. Do these pieces of skeletal fruit remind us to be mindful of our consumption? Do we even really truly think about where what we consume comes from? What it’s made of? What death and harm simple everyday products causes to those who don’t have the luxury to partake on the demand side of capitalism? Simultaneously fun and disturbing, Monica Piloni’s work is provocative and inquisitive. (via designboom)

Currently Trending

Unseen Art: A Revolutionary Project Allowing The Blind To Experience Classic Works Of Art For The First Time

mid-pic-1jbthmykm2tryb6udxnfr jdooscxcb0svx92sbueq

We live in a visual culture. Our daily ability to understand cultural references and have collective visual experiences shapes our discourse with our greater surrounding. Imagine never knowing what the mystery smile of the Mona Lisa looks like, or not being able to experience any work of art at all with out being told what it looks like. Imagine never being able to experience on your own how a piece of art makes you feel. For millions of blind people over the world, that is an everyday reality. Unseen Art, a project creating 3D models of master artworks, will change the art experience for the blind forever. With the help of resources from all over the world, the Unseen Art team is gathering information in order to create 3D documents of classic works, such as the Mona Lisa, to be printed in 3D form. Even better, the project is sharing these models for free, making sure that their information can be accessed anywhere in the world there is an 3D printer. Through the collaboration of 3D technicians, artists, and the visually impaired, the project has started to become a reality. With a little help, the project will be able to launch major gallery shows, create a 3D art community to constantly improve the project, and, ultimately, make art more accessible than ever.

“It would be a revolution to get blind people going to art galleries,” states Eija-Liisa, the cultural director of The Blind Federation of Finland.

Please check out more information on Unseen Art here. Please support the project by donating here.

Currently Trending

Made With Color Presents- Micah Ganske Depicts A Future Where Man And Machine Come Together To Create A Better World

Micah Gansk - Design 3 Micah Gansk - Design 5 Micah Gansk - Design 2 Micah Gansk - Design 1

 Premier website builder Made With Color and Beautiful/Decay have teamed up again to bring you exclusive artist features. We show you exciting artists and designers who use Made With Color to create a clean and modern website. But it doesn’t just help artists create a minimal, mobile-responsive website; Made With Color also allows them to do it in only a few minutes without have to know any coding. This week we are featuring the work of New York artist Micah Ganske.

Soft, pale colors mixed with futuristic forms. Micah Ganske’s paintings are the reflection of future habitats and societies, combining the notion of technology degrading population with a hopeful note. Influenced by the ghost-town of Centralia, PA, the artist beautifully depicts abandoned city landscapes. 

In his series “My Future Is Always Tomorrow’, technology is taking over. The paintings  depict a world overtaken by technology and its effect on human kind. “My new sculptures and drawings express my hope that we will further use technology to improve and evolve our very selves.” Ganske’s vision doesn’t end with just paintings. Along with video and virtual reality experiences he also creates intricate sculptures of spacecrafts using a 3D printer. These are part of his fleet of spacecrafts that are meant to eventually come together to create a larger than life humanoid traveling through space. A symbolic vision to forecast humans embracing technology instead of enduring it.

Currently Trending

Young-Deok Seo’s Welded Chain Sculptures Express Human Suffering And Detachment

Young-Deok Seo - Sculpture Young-Deok Seo - Sculpture Young-Deok Seo - Sculpture Young-Deok Seo - Sculpture

Young-Deok Seo is a South Korean artist who creates what he calls “iron men”: nude sculptures made completely out of welded chain fragments. Demonstrating his deep fascination and concern for the human body, Seo builds standing figures, heads, busts, and torsos by carefully melting and linking chain fragments together piece by piece. The result is a series of elaborate assemblages, the links seeming to undulate like living cells. Each work entails a huge commitment of Seo’s time, patience, and concentration, making his artwork a form of spiritual practice.

What is most remarkable about these re-imaginations of the body is the way each piece tells a story—both intimate and universal—about the pangs of existence. On his website, Seo’s write-up describes his figures as embodying intense suffering, and conversely, an ascetic emptiness; they are at once “haggard like a seeker,” “infected by something unknown,” and devoid of all “earthly desires and passions” (Source). Despite their complex “skins,” each figure is ominously hollow. Some of them are incomplete, with their faces and limbs appearing to dissolve into the surrounding space. This suggests a chain reaction of the body to the outside world, a fusion of pain and hope that resembles destruction as much as it does liberation.

Visit Young-Deok Seo’s website and Facebook page to learn more. (Via My Amp Goes to 11)

Currently Trending